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Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of Pima and Papago Indian agriculture found in the catalog.

Pima and Papago Indian agriculture

Edward Franklin Castetter

Pima and Papago Indian agriculture

by Edward F. Castetter and Willis H. Bell.

by Edward Franklin Castetter

  • 96 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by The University of New Mexico press in Albuquerque, N.M .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Pima Indians.,
  • Tohono O"Odham Indians.,
  • Indians of North America -- Agriculture.

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesUniversity of New Mexico. School of Inter-American Affairs. Inter-Americana [series] Studies -- 1.
    ContributionsBell, Willis Harvey, 1908-
    The Physical Object
    Pagination245 p.
    Number of Pages245
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17928917M
    LC Control Number42022813

    Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. Author of Pima and Papago Indian agriculture, Yuman Indian agriculture Edward Franklin Castetter | Open Library. The Apaches were making tizwin when the soldiers and Pima scouts attacked them; they took the alarm and escaped, leaving the liquor in the hands of the allies. Appears in 16 books from Page - on the ground under the shade of one of the cotton sheds.5/5(1).

    Cite this Record. Pima and Papago Indian Agriculture. Edward F. Castetter, Willis H. Bell. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press. (tDAR id: )Cited by: Applied Geography (), 6, Papago Indian desert agriculture and water control in the Sonoran Desert, G. P. Nabhan Office of Arid Lands Studies, N. Park, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ , USA Abstract This paper describes in detail the characteristics and conditions of a successful floodwater farming system in arid Arizona and Mexico from the occasion of the first Cited by:

    Full text of "Basketry of the Papago and Pima" See other formats. 6 photoprints: gelatin silver ; 16 x 21 cm. or smaller. | Pima granary and dwelling; Pima women at work; Papago (Tohono O'Odham) women making pot (olla) and carrying water in pot balanced on head; cliff dwellings ("Montezuma's castle").


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Pima and Papago Indian agriculture by Edward Franklin Castetter Download PDF EPUB FB2

Pima and Papago Indian Agriculture First Edition by Edward F. Castetter (Author) ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important. ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book Cited by: Pima and Papago Indian agriculture.

Albuquerque, N.M., The University of New Mexico press, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Edward. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Castetter, Edward Franklin, Pima and Papago Indian agriculture. New York: AMS Press, [] (OCoLC) Pima Indians, the indigenous people who lived in the area around Mission Tumacácori in the 17 th century, referred to themselves simply as “People”.

Such was the case in most technologically primitive cultures around the world that had little or no contact with other groups.

In the Pima language, the word for “People” is “O’odham”. Book: Pima and Papago Indian agriculture. + pp.

Abstract: The Pimans, a name applied to the whole group of Pima Papago Indians in both Mexico mexico Subject Category: Geographic EntitiesCited by: The intensive farming of the Pima made possible larger villages than were feasible for their neighbours and relatives, the Tohono O’odham (Papago).

With larger communities came a stronger and more complex political organization. In the early Spanish colonial period the Pima possessed a strong tribal organization, with a tribal chief elected by the chiefs of the various villages.

About this Book Catalog Record Details. Pima and Papago Indian agriculture. Castetter, Edward Franklin, View full catalog record. Rights: Public Domain, Google-digitized. Pima Indian Study.

Pima Indians, living in a geographically defined part of the Gila River Indian Community of Arizona, have participated in a longitudinal study of diabetes and its complications since (Bennett et al., ), from which much of our current understanding of diabetes among Native Americans has been : Gary D.

Sandefur, Ronald R. Rindfuss, Barney Cohen. The Tohono O'odham share linguistic and cultural roots with the closely related Akimel O'odham (People of the River), whose lands lie just south of present-day Phoenix, along the lower Gila Sobaipuri are ancestors to both the Tohono Oʼodham and the Akimel Oʼodham, and they resided along the major rivers of southern Arizona.

Ancient pictographs adorn a rock wall that juts up out of. The Pima / ˈ p iː m ə / (or Akimel O'odham, also spelled Akimel Oʼotham, "River People", formerly known as Pima) are a group of Native Americans living in an area consisting of what is now central and southern majority population of the surviving two bands of the Akimel O'odham are based in two reservations: the Keli Akimel Oʼotham on the Gila River Indian Community (GRIC) and.

Threatened exploitation of Pima Indians / ([Philadelphia, Pa.: Indian Rights Association, ]), by Wm. Alexander Brown and Matthew K. Sniffen (page images at HathiTrust) Pima and Papago Indian agriculture. (Albuquerque, N.M.: The University of New Mexico press, ), by Edward Franklin Castetter and Willis Harvey Bell (page images at.

Apache agriculture was probably simpler and cruder than that of the Pima-Papago. It lacked irrigation but further data are unavailable. Wild Plants Utilized. Even the Pima, most highly developed agriculturists of the three tribes considered, depend more on wild products than on their agricultural staples.

"Admixture in Pima Includes Greek and Sardinian: Genetic Signature of the Minoans, Sea Peoples and Other Mediterranean Peoples in the Southwest?” Summary The Pima Indians and their southern cousins the Papago have been studied intensely by ethnologists and others.

They are often represented as definitive specimens of the “Amerind” ethnic type. "Extract from the twenty-sixth Annual report of the Bureau of American Ethnology."--Title page. Linguistics: Vocabularies, songs, speeches: p. Includes bibliographical references and index.

University of California Press; pages; $40 hardcover, $16 paperback In the spring ofin a village on the Gila River Indian Reservation in Arizona, a Pima Indian nicknamed Skunk, who "was. This book forms the first of a projected series published by the School of Inter-American Affairs of the University of New Mexico "bearing on Latin America and the American Southwest".

It represents the results of three years' field study by the authors, supplemented by other data obtained from the literature. Though both authors are botanists (one imagines that the ideal combination would be Cited by: 9. Papago bowls and trays are flat based with full, well-rounded curves.

A tabulation of shapes is given by Kissell (). Papago materials are bear grass or Yucca baccata as a makeshift substitute for the foundation. The Pima foundation is of cat-tail (Typha angustifolio), or the poorer parts of old cottonwood twigs (Populus fremontii).

Pima and Papago Indian Agriculture. EDWARD F. CASTETTER and WILLIS H. BELL. (Inter-Americana Studies I. University of New Mexico Press, ) This is a book of pages, attractively printed and bound.

It is the first of an "Inter-Americana Series, dealing with Latin America and cultural relations in the South-west of the United States.". Click to read more about Pima and Papago Indian agriculture by Edward F.

Castetter. LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for bookloversAuthor: Edward F. Castetter. Inter-Americana Studies I: Pima and Papago Indian Agriculture Hardcover – January 1, by Edward F.

and Willis H. Bell Castetter (Author) out of 5 stars 1 rating. See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from 5/5(1). Tohono O'odham Indian Fact Sheet. Native American Facts For Kids was written for young people learning about the Tohono O'odham or Papago Indian tribe for school or home-schooling reports.

We encourage students and teachers to visit our Tohono O'odham language and culture pages for in-depth information about the tribe, but here are our answers to the questions we are most often asked by.Pima Indians.

From the Catholic Encyclopedia. An important tribe of Southern Arizona, centering along the middle Gila and its affluent, the Salt River. Linguistically they belong to the Piman branch of the widely extended Shoshonean stock, and their language, with dialectic variation, is the same as that spoken also by the Pápago and extinct Sobaipuri of southern Arizona, and by the Navome of.The Pima within the United States are gathered with Papago and Maricopa on the Gila River and Salt River reservations.

The Pima population was 3, in ; in .